How Ivy Leaguers Have Snow Ball Fights

How Ivy Leaguers Have Snow Ball Fights

 

Three Princeton students pose after the Freshman, Sophomore snowball fight. 1893. Princeton, NJ.
This is a long held tradition and obviously innocent virgin snow is not all that is used to make the snowballs. It is said that this ritual is no longer something that the school condones, but that has not stopped the students from continuing the yearly bloody (and from the looks of it swollen) battle.
Now if I was ever to have thought of going to Princeton (as they would have EVER let me in) this would have stopped me in my tracks. I am not a big fan of things flying at my head any kind of balls (ah-hem), bats, or in this case snowballs laced with rocks. You pay a gazillion and twenty dollars to attend this Ivy League school only to know that, during your first two years, you may be attacked at any sign of snow fall all in the name of custom!! No thank you!

Advertisements

Image

3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. pouringmyartout
    Jul 16, 2013 @ 18:26:40

    When we were kids, my brothers and I and some kids from the neighborhood used to have mud ball wars… but we put rocks in the… and sticks… it was brutal. We also had wars with those large strips of eucalyptus bark that fall off the trees and then curl up when they dry. They turn into hollow spears. They fly a long way.

    Like

    Reply

    • Dagmar Tully
      Jul 16, 2013 @ 18:49:26

      Seriously I cannot even imagine and reading that made my “mom” stomach hurt a bit. Did you end up looking like these 3, just with more puncture wounds?

      Like

      Reply

      • pouringmyartout
        Jul 16, 2013 @ 18:55:20

        Yes, yes we did. I remember once I was going inside to put a band aide on, and I was standing in front of our back door, which was mostly glass, and I saw a big mud ball headed for the back of my head. And I knew it had a rock in it. But if I ducked it would go through the window. That one rung my bell.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: