No Romance in the Wee Hours

 

Image

 

I came across a picture while doing some research, it was an entry in Theodore Roosevelt’s diary.  All it said was “The light has gone out of my life.” This lit the fire under my curiosity (I need to know or I will die).

 

ImageWhat light? Was he talking Politics?? Was he speaking figuratively? So as I lay in bed that night the clock ticking upwards (it is digital but seriously I hear ticking) to 2 a.m. , pondering the meaning behind this journal  entry I had to get up and get to the bottom of this. Of course, this was after I had poked my peacefully sleeping (snoring like a wild beast) husband and asked if he ever took a course on Teddy in college. He gave me his stock answer for such things, “Whaaaa-helllll, huh?” and then straight back into his snore barely missing a beat.  We, the two of us, have this routine down pat. 

 

 

Getting up I head down to the computer and what I Imagefound was scraggily, walrus mustached Teddy was very, very handsome when he was a young lad (by that I mean smoking hot in a rugged way ) and that his light was a love that ended in the saddest of tragedies.  He was a romantic that was broken early, but still became a great man despite it.

 

His first wife Alice was the love of his life and the light that he spoke of in his diary.  It seems that in February 1879 he met the woman of his dreams and one year and one day later she accepted his proposal.  On Valentine’s Day.Image

 

They were married that same year. On February 12, 1884 Alice gave birth to a healthy baby girl. Teddy was no home because he had been sure that the baby would be born on Valentine’s Day, on the 4th year of their engagement. He received two telegrams the next day telling him of his daughter’s birth and as he set out to head home another informing him that Alice was ill.  He reached home at midnight and spent two hours holding his wife, until he heard word that his mother’s health Imagehad made a turn for the worse so he went downstairs to be with her until her death that day of Typhoid fever.  Only to go back upstairs and hold his wife the last few hours of her life (she died of Toxemia) both his mother and his wife died on Valentine’s Day the 4th anniversary of his engagement.

 

ImageTeddy was so distraught by his wife’s death that except for his diary entry “The light has gone out of my life” he never spoke of her again.

 

Privately he published the following tribute to Alice:

 

She was beautiful in face and form, and lovelier still in spirit; As a flower she grew, and as a fair young flower she died. Her life had been always in the sunshine; there had never come to her a single sorrow; and none ever knew her who did not love and revere her for the bright, sunny temper and her saintly unselfishness. Fair, pure, and joyous as a maiden; loving, tender, and happy. As a young wife; when she had just become a mother, when her life seemed to be just begun, and when the years seemed so bright before her—then, by a strange and terrible fate, death came to her. And when my heart’s dearest died, the light went from my life forever

 

Alice was 22.Image

 

 

 

 

 

Remind me to not do research that makes my throat lumpy and my heart weepy in the wee hours of the morning.

 

(http://thehistoryprofessor.us/bin/histprof/ladies/bio/26ars.html63424)

 

 

 

 

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. That Suburban Momma
    Aug 24, 2013 @ 05:38:26

    This makes me soo very sad. 😦

    Like

    Reply

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